According to current research, certain populations of reptile and amphibian species in north and Central Queensland were separated from larger, more extensive groups further south. This collaborative research project between Queensland Museum Network and Griffith University will shed light on how past climatic changes have shaped the distribution of animals across the Eungella region.

Research aim

Researchers will use high-throughput genomic and CT scanning methods to refine our understanding of origins and diversity of isolated vertebrate populations in Queensland's rainforest. 

Research outcomes

  • Describe new endemic species using best practice modern integrative approaches, critical new Museum collections and new digital data.
  • Identify potential conservation concern for new speicies.
  •  Use new genetic data to undertake a synthetic cross-species analysis of patterns in isolation history in this region.
  • Complement fossil-based analysis from South Walker Creek and Mt Etna which also focus on how past climatic changes have shaped the distribution of animals across tropical north and Central Queensland. 

Research deliverables

  • Targeted field work focused on sampling from vine thickets to the south; samples from these areas are critical to understanding how distinctive Eungella populations are.
  • CT scanning limb reduced skinks to underpin taxonomic work.
  • Genetic analyses for key species.

This research is a collaboration between Queensland Museum Network and Griffith University.